Look to the Future

Look to the Future

Look to the future is in the circle of a mother and child. The bond will be forever. The love is endless.
Kaydahzinne Warrior

Kaydahzinne Warrior

“Kaydahzinne Warrior” is a Chiricahua Apache warrior. He is riding through the land that he loves. “Kay-daha-zinne” married Cochise’s daughter “Dash-den-zhoos”, both are my great grandparents. For as long as I can remember, that was frequently talked about by my Dad and some of Cochise’s other descendents. I thank “Bik’egu’inda’n” (the one who gives life), for giving me this gift to pass on to my Apache people, and to share with the rest of the world. Juh’,e-ya-ho (It is good, how else can it be). Still Available, call...
Chiricahua Family

Chiricahua Family

This traditional bronze titled “Chiricahua Family” represents Cochise’s side of the Apache family. The Chiricahua were said to be the most feared Apache. But as shown here, inside the soul was a family, the core were love and happiness, which could not be taken away. This is a strong circle and I am proud to be a part of that circle. I envision my Apache family, sitting somewhere in the “Stronghold” in the Arizona mountains. That is who I am, and that is where this beautiful bronze sculpture came...
Apache Maiden Burden Basket

Apache Maiden Burden Basket

The burden basket and the Apache Maiden Ceremonial are both strong and powerful gifts to the Apache people. I created this sculpture to share those gifts and provide a lasting representation of both. There are many more traditional items used ceremony, but I have chosen only these two. The burden basket has many uses, to carry berries, food, wood and many other things. Tree sap was used to cover the basket so that it would hold water. basket weaving was handed down through the years. It is a sacred tradition and a cherished skill. The basket was used in sacred ceremony. The gift was passed to my grandmother Helen Chatto, who gave the gift to my mother, and now my sisters. All the sacred prayers and songs for this ceremony were theirs. I can see my Mom sitting under a tree making baskets. Right before the “Coming of Age” ceremony. Because she was a “Warrior Woman”, I put the maiden and the basket together to honor her and this tradition. Everything was sacred to my Mom. The maiden was adorned with buckskin, eagle feathers, jingles, turquoise, mescal beads, ablaone and other traditional items. This strong and beautiful sculpture means a lot to me. I want other people to share the powerful gift that was given the Apache people. Like a stone, we will remain...